Music Therapy: Research and Evidence-Based Practice

Music Therapy: Research and Evidence-Based Practice

ABSTRACT: The profession of music therapy in the United States has a rich history and has grown considerably over the past few decades. Music therapy is the clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to achieve individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship with a credentialed music therapist. Music therapists in the United States go through rigorous training to earn the MT-BC (music therapist-board certified) credential. Individuals of all ages have been shown to benefit from music therapy, and treatment may occur in a wide range of settings, including children’s facilities and schools, mental health settings, medical settings, geriatric facilities, hospice and bereavement services, and private practice settings. Music therapists may address cognitive, communicative, emotional, musical, physiological, psychosocial, sensorimotor, or spiritual goals. Broadly speaking, music therapy interventions may involve listening to music, talking about music, making music, and/or moving to music; the specific intervention or interventions are selected based on the specific needs, abilities, goals, and preferences of the client. Live, preferred music, although not used with every client, has been shown to be highly effective in helping bring about therapeutic change. Various approaches to music therapy exist, and the research base on music therapy treatment, while already strong, is rapidly growing.

REVIEWER: Peter Gerlings

AUTHOR SUMMARY: Olivia Swedberg Yinger, PhD, MT-BC

READ MORE: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780323485609060010